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China, Italy agree to expand legislative exchanges

ROME, March 22 — Visiting President Xi Jinping met with Italian Senate Speaker Maria Elisabetta Alberti

Casellati here Friday on expanding exchanges and cooperation between the two countries’ legislative institutions.

China and Italy have enjoyed a traditional friendship, with the ancient Silk Road closely linking the two peoples, Xi said.

Since they established diplomatic relations nearly 50 years ago, the China-Italy ties have seen healthy and stable devel

opment, and the two countries have become important partners who trust each other and work together, Xi said.

The visit is meant to consolidate the stability and strategic nature of the China-Ita

ly relations in the long term, and comprehensively elevate the level of their mutually beneficial cooperation, Xi said.

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hina military threat’ is a fallacy: Ministry of National Defense

The Chinese military strongly opposes playing up the fallacy of the so-called “China’s militar

y threat” by some US military officials, as such a zero-sum game and Cold War mentality is not cond

ucive to the sound development of bilateral military relations, a Chinese spokesman said on Friday.

“China has followed a path of peaceful development and has firmly implemente

d a national defense policy which is defensive in nature,” said Wu Qian, spokesman of the Ministry of Na

tional Defense, adding that a growing Chinese military will better help maintain world peace.

He said the Chinese side has noticed that defense authorities in the United States often do som

e “selfish calculations” for more in the military budget by hyping threats from other countries.

“Such practice is short-sighted, and very dangerous,” he said. “We urge the US side to give up the Col

d War mentality and look at China’s development of national defense and military in a rational way.”

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And if parliament *actually* says what it wantsad to ask, didn’t yo

  It’s very likely that any consensus that could be reached across the Commons would be a softer Brexit than the one May is currently pursuing.

  That, I am afraid, is still a fairly open-ended answer. It might mean the need to renegotiate, which would mean a longer exten

sion, which would mean being in the EU elections, which could mean a second referendum, ultimately.

  The key point here is that cross-party consensus might soun

d nice, but on an issue as divisive as Brexit, it’s as likely as anything to blow up both main parties.

  While things are far from rosy and three weeks is not enough t

ime to sort much, it’s worth noting that while Brexit might not be going terribly well, the last thr

ee years have been a huge learning curve for the entire UK. We know more now than we did.

  So while the next bit of the Brexit process might look crunchy, the decisions made in the coming days will not be made lightly.

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All the devices were judged to be viable, and the package

  sent to Heathrow Airport burst into flames after being opened by staff. Nobody was injured by the devices and no arrests have been made.

  The packages were posted with Irish stamps and had return addresses in Dublin, prompting Irish police to join the investigation. The packages were all A4-size

d white postal bags containing yellow padded bags, which were capable of igniting when opened.

  Police Scotland confirmed that a controlled explosion was carried out on the p

ackage found at the University of Glasgow on March 6 as a precautionary measure.

  The Metropolitan Police and Police Scotland said in a joint statem

ent that the devices “bore similarities” to past packages “linked to dissident groups asso

ciated with Northern Ireland related terrorism,” and that “officers were already looking at this as a line of enquiry.”

  The devices did not cause any injuries or damage.

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I would have done it much differently. I actually told

  Theresa May how to do it, but she didn’t listen to me,” Trump told the tabloid. “The deal she is striking is a much different deal than the one people voted on.”

  Trump apologized in private to May, one of the rare times he‘s admitted wrong. And tho

ugh he’s expressed a desire to remain diplomatically impartial — “I think we will stay right in our lane,” he sa

id last week when questioned about Brexit — he has nevertheless bemoaned May’s handling of the issue over and over.

  ”I’m surprised at how badly it’s all gone from the standpoint of a negotiation,” he said in the Oval Office last week, mome

nts after suggesting he wouldn’t offer an opinion on the issue. “I gave the prime minister my ideas on how to n

egotiate it. And I think you would’ve been successful. She didn’t listen to that, and that’s fine.”

  A few weeks before, Trump spoke briefly with one of the UK’s most visible pro-Brexit campaig

ners, Nigel Farage, on the sidelines of a conservative conference outside Washington. And he’s ma

intained close ties to the hardline conservatives who have bemoaned May’s handling of the matter.

  Trump wasn’t alone in his criticism. Two of his top confidants — son Donald Trump Jr. and national security adviser John

Bolton — both offered critical views this week of May and her plan to try and delay Britain’s exit from Europe.

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Greater opening-up pledged to bolster education meets

China will expand opening-up in education, enhance mutual learning with different countri

es and jointly push forward the development of education, President Xi Jinping said on Wednesday.

Xi made the remark during a meeting with Ha

rvard University President Lawrence Bacow at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.

Xi said China advocates mutual learning, encourages its students to

study overseas and supports exchanges and cooperation in education with other countries.

He said he hopes more positive outcomes can be achieved from people-to-people exchanges between China and the United States.

Bilateral exchanges and cooperation in education are impor

tant for China-US relations because they help enhance public support for those relations, he said.

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May’s spokesman said Tusk’s comments were in keepi

  ing with her request for a short delay.She herself told a rowdy session of parliament that she c

ould not countenance the prospect of a long delay – which could give time for notional alter

native approaches to emerge, but would infuriate Brexit supporters in her own party.

  ”As prime minister, I am not prepared to delay Brexit any further than the 30th of June,” she said.

  May said she planned to ask parliament to vote a third time on her departure

deal, which lawmakers have voted down twice. She did not say when the vote would happen.

  ”RATIFY OR EXIT”

  If May cannot win over enough reluctant lawmakers to pass her deal next week, Britain faces the choice of reque

sting a longer delay or leaving the EU as planned on March 29 – without a deal to cushion the economic upheaval.

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Her announcement that she was asking for a three-month

  delay caused uproar in the chamber.

The opposition Labour Party accused her of “blackm

ail, bullying and bribery” in her attempts to push her deal through, and one

prominent Brexit supporter in he

r own Conservative Party said seeking a delay was “betraying the British people”.

  Britain voted in 2016 to leave the EU by 52 percent to 48 – a decision that has

split the country, opening up divisive deb

ates over the future of the economy, Britain’s place in the world and the

nature of Britishness itself.

  A European Commission document seen by Reuters said the delay should

either be several weeks shorter, to avoid a clas

h with European Parliament elections in May, or last at least until the end of the

year, which would oblige Br

itain to take part in the elections – something that May said was not in Britain’s interest.

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The pound fell on the uncertainty surrounding the poten

ial delay and the fact that a no-deal Brexit remained possible. By 1800 GMT it was down around 0.4 percent against the dollar.

Nearly three years after the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union, there is still no

clarity over how, when or even whether the world’s fifth largest economy should leave the bloc it joined in 1973.

When May set the March 29 exit date two years ago by serving the formal

Article 50 divorce papers, she declared there would be “no turning back”. But parliament’s ref

usal to ratify the withdrawal deal she agreed with the EU has thrust her government into crisis.

The Labour Party said that, by choosing a short delay, May was forcing

lawmakers to decide between accepting a deal they have already rejected or leaving without a deal.

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New Mueller probe revelations explain Trump’s rage

President Donald Trump looks — and is acting — rattled and encircled by the Russia investigation. And a series of fresh d

isclosures on Tuesday show there is every reason for him to feel threatened by the vast shadow it is casting over his life, business and presidency.

Newly unsealed court documents detailing special counsel Robert Mueller’s activity reveal an investigative field

of breathtaking scope and a prosecutorial machine that ratcheted quickly up in mid-2017.

The search warrants targeting Trump’s ex-personal lawyer Michael Cohen offer a glimpse of the covert world of the probe. As

is often the case with Mueller, they give only a tantalizing hint of the wider, yet still hidden, puzzle.

In court filing, Robert Mueller’s team says it’s very busy this week

But such disclosures are almost never good news for Trump.

There is enough to explain from Tuesday’s reveal why the in

vestigation must be weighing on Trump’s spirits, and driving his angry Twitter outbursts.

The vast breadth of the investigation by various jurisdictions also could offer a rich seam for Democratic House chair

en should they eventually subpoena primary evidence uncovered by Mueller and other prosecutors.

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